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EQUINOSIS Q USER TRAINING

Visit the Equinosis Customer Convenience Center to discover training videos, recorded advanced webinars & other how-to videos!

Why Become an OES Member?

In addition to the many tools and resources available to all our customers,  Objective Evaluation Support (OES) Program members also enjoy the following benefits.
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10% OFF OES Member Discount

Members get 10% off all online purchases from the CCC.

One-on-one Consultation

Members get unlimited clinical, technical, and practice building support.

Access to Training & Case Study Library

Gain exclusive CCC access to Q Case Studies, Practice Building Tips & more.

Free Software Updates

Download a fully licensed copy of the latest version of Lameness Locator ($2000 value).

Clinical Consult Including Data Interpretation

Get help from Equinosis veterinarians who are experts with the Q and clinical applications.

Discount on RACE-Approved CE

5% discount on VetPD.com and Equinosis Continuing Education course registration fees.

The Latest in Objective Lameness Evaluation

[WEBINAR SERIES] Equinosis Q with Lameness Locator Basic Training

A special thank you to all veterinarians providing essential services through the COVID-19 pandemic. For those of you with more time at home, what better way to spend your time in quarantine than to brush up on your knowledge of biomechanical data collection and interpretation? We have developed a 4-part basic training…

Lameness Measurement: Principles of Implementation in Horse Racing | Equinosis, LLC Veterinary Advisory Council responds to NAARV letter
Clarification of Equinosis Q (Lameness Locator®) Principles of Implementation in Horse Racing 

From:  Equinosis, LLC Veterinary Advisory Council – Kevin Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Laurie Tyrrell, DVM  | Deborah Sieber, BVetMed  | Christina Frigast, CANDMEDVET MRCVS  On November 5th, 2019, the North American Association of Racetrack Veterinarians (NAARV) released a statement supporting the recent reforms enacted in California and called for continued improvement in pre-race protocols. Their recommendations included the use of inertial sensor measurement with the Equinosis Q (Lameness Locator®) in addition to the existing pre–race examination.  We affirm this significant…

[WEBINAR SERIES] Equinosis Q with Lameness Locator Basic Training

A special thank you to all veterinarians providing essential services through the COVID-19 pandemic. For those of you with more time at home, what better way to spend your time in quarantine than to brush up on your knowledge of biomechanical data collection and interpretation? We have developed a 4-part basic training series dedicated to just that.


Equinosis Q with Lameness Locator Basic Training – A 4 Part Series

This is a reminder for those that did not attend last week that there are still times available in the coming weeks! 

Part 1 of 4: Utilizing Inertial Sensors in Equine Lameness Measurement – the Model, the Method, and Biomechanics

Available to DVMs & non-DVMs

Topics include: the biomechanical model of vertical head and pelvic movement used for the measurement of equine lameness. An explanation of the lameness metrics, stride plots, and reference ranges will also be discussed.

Available Dates & Times

  • Mon, March 30, 2020 @ 9 AM CST
  • Wed, April 8, 2020 @ 6 PM CST

register for basic training module part 1 >


Part 2 of 4: Utilizing the Q with Lameness Locator – Software Navigation and Data Collection Guidelines

Available to DVMs & non-DVMs

Topics include: horse instrumentation, data collection guidelines for straight lines, flexions, lunging and blocking, software navigation, and reporting and data management options.

Available Dates & Times:

  • Tue, March 31, 2020 @ 9 AM CST
  • Thurs, Apr 9, 2020 @ 6 PM CST

register for basic training module part 2 >


Part 3 of 4: Utilizing Inertial Sensors in Equine Lameness Measurement – Evaluating the Straight Line (DVM ONLY)

Topics include: Data interpretation of the straight line, reviewing lameness metrics, degree of evidence, multiple limb lameness (including recognizing compensatory patterns) and the importance of stabilizing lameness.

Available Dates & Times:

  • Mon, Apr 1 @ 9 AM CST
  • Wed, Apr 13 @ 6 PM CST

register for basic training module part 3 >


Part 4 of 4: Utilizing Inertial Sensors in Equine Lameness Measurement – Evaluating Lunging, Flexions, Blocks, and Under Saddle (DVM ONLY)

Topics include: Data interpretation, and special considerations for lunging (including expected patterns based on surface characteristics), flexion and manipulation tests, diagnostic blocks (the calculation of change), and under saddle evaluations

Available Dates & Times

  • Thurs, Apr 2 @ 9 AM CST
  • Tues, Apr 14 @ 6 PM CST

register for basic training module part 4 >

Equine Lameness and Poor Performance-Problems Of The Forelimb And Neck
The Lameness Locator Helps ‘See’ What Veterinarians Can’t

For those unfamiliar with how the Equinosis Q – Lameness Locator works, the Paulick Report published a very nice overview this morning written by Sarah Coleman. Kudos to Dr. Rhodes Bell for elevating the care racehorses receive in the Lexington area. Objectivity and transparency – a winning combination for equine athletes. https://www.paulickreport.com/…/the-lameness-locator-helps…/

Lameness Measurement: Principles of Implementation in Horse Racing | Equinosis, LLC Veterinary Advisory Council responds to NAARV letter
Clarification of Equinosis Q (Lameness Locator®) Principles of Implementation in Horse Racing 
From:  Equinosis, LLC Veterinary Advisory Council – Kevin Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Laurie Tyrrell, DVM  | Deborah Sieber, BVetMed  | Christina Frigast, CANDMEDVET MRCVS 

On November 5th, 2019, the North American Association of Racetrack Veterinarians (NAARV) released a statement supporting the recent reforms enacted in California and called for continued improvement in pre-race protocols. Their recommendations included the use of inertial sensor measurement with the Equinosis Q (Lameness Locator®) in addition to the existing prerace examination.  We affirm this significant advancement will provide greater sensitivity in identifying horses at risk of injury in training and racing and improve the overall welfare of the equine athlete.  With that said, we felt it prudent to clarify what is currently known and what remains to be learned about the application of objective lameness measurement in monitoringmanagement, anregulation of Thoroughbred racehorses. 

For horse owners, trainers, and other industry professionals, we feel it is necessary to clarify certain aspects of implementation of the Lameness Locator® given the current state of technology and scientific study.   

The following points summarize key considerations for implementation of objective lameness measurement in the regulatory process 

  • Our use of the term “lameness” refers to a clinical sign (symptom), not to pathology or disease. 
  • We are confident that body-mounted inertial sensors are the best method to measure lameness in the horse.  
  • By using body-mounted inertial sensors to monitor changes in lameness measurement, we think that reliable indicators can be found that can determine whether or not a horse should be subjected to diagnostic evaluation (bone scan, MRI, etc.) before allowing it to race. This can lead to a decrease in racing and training related injuries in horses (catastrophic and otherwise). 
  • We think that the change in measurement from a previous measurement, and not a single measurement, will provide the most relevant information associated with training or racing related injuries.  
  • Using an arbitrary single measurement to decide if a horse is fit or unfit to race or train is unlikely to protect horses from injury.  
  • We believe that a cost-effective process can be developed to regularly evaluate Thoroughbred racehorses in training with body-mounted inertial sensors, and that this process can be designed with minimal impact to the horses, trainers, or regulatory officials involved in Thoroughbred racing. 

For those familiar with the current Lameness Locator® reference ranges, these are lower limits intended to identify lameness with high sensitivity.  They were determined for non-racehorses. They were not intended to beused for screening race horses before racing.   A reference range for this specific purpose would need to be determined. A proposed study to use body-mounted inertial sensors on racing and training Thoroughbreds to reduce injury rate is available for those interested in collaboration.  

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