Our Mission

Helping veterinarians provide the most objective, efficient and profitable biomechanical care possible.

ABOUT THE TECHNOLOGY

The Equinosis Q with Lameness Locator biomechanical care platform is a real-time, handheld, field-based system that enables a veterinarian to objectively measure lameness in horses with non-invasive inertial sensors. Evolving from the development of motion analysis algorithms at the University of Missouri using a high-speed camera and treadmill-based system, it is the gold standard for field-based measurement of lameness. The algorithms were developed in a collaborative effort between practicing equine veterinarians, led by Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery Dr. Kevin Keegan, and engineers, led by Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineer Dr. Frank Pai, for the specific purpose of lameness evaluation in horses.   Dr. Pai’s research interest and expertise in “structural damage detection” were instrumental in the development of the algorithms used in the Q.

The motion variables most likely to detect and quantify lameness were first found using sophisticated data mining search techniques and then tested and validated with robust neural network classification schemes. Later collaboration between the University of Missouri and Dr. Yoshiharu Yanezawa, Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Hiroshima Institute of Technology in Japan adopted this analysis approach to a system of wirelessly-transmitted, body-mounted inertial sensors, ideal for field use.  Dr. Yonezawa’s research interest and expertise in “Bio-instrumentation systems” were instrumental in the development of the hardware utilized in the Q.

ABOUT EQUINOSIS

Equinosis, LLC was founded in 2007 in Columbia, Missouri with its first objective to make the Equinosis Q with Lameness Locator available to equine veterinarians and to elevate the quality of care, health, and well-being of horses.

Ongoing research and development endeavors were supported by the National Science Foundation’s Small Business Technology Transfer Research program from 2009 to 2015 with 5 STTR awards.

THE TEAM

Kevin Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS
Kevin Keegan, DVM MS, Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons, Chief Science Officer

Professor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery at the University of Missouri and Director of the E. Paige Laurie Endowed Program in Equine Lameness. Dr. Kevin Keegan graduated in 1983 from the University of Missouri…

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Dr. Deborah Sieber Bio Image
Deborah Sieber, BVetMed Objective Evaluation Expert

Dr. Deborah Sieber joined Equinosis in 2016 to help spread the principles of objective evaluation globally. As an Expert in objective evaluation, and an avid traveler, Deborah provides product education…

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Dr. Laurie Tyrrell-Schroder Bio Image
Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM Director of Veterinary Services

Dr. Laurie Tyrrell joined Equinosis at the end of 2009 to head business development and serve as a principal investigator for the company’s National Science Foundation grant. In her current role…

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Andy Wolter, BS, MBA Chief Executive Officer

Andy Wolter helped create Equinosis in 2008, serving as a board member, strategic and operational advisor, and general manager before assuming the role of CEO.  Andy completed a degree in…

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MORE FROM EQUINOSIS

CONNECT WITH US

We are proud to sponsor monthly LIVE events & webinars, available to current Equinosis Q users and licensed veterinarians.

MAP OF CURRENT USERS

Search our database of the world’s best equine veterinarians and top objective lameness evaluation experts.

CUSTOMER CONVENIENCE CENTER (CCC)

Current customers and DVM guests, please visit the CCC to find software updates, consult scheduling, replacement components and more!

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Objective Lameness Measurement in U.S. Horse Racing – For the Welfare of the Equine Athlete

Objective lameness measurements seem to draw immediate criticism from some associated with horse racing – both veterinarians and horsemen alike.  With an incomplete understanding of the technology and how it is being applied successfully at racetracks in Singapore and Hong Kong, some conclude that inertial sensors are “too sensitive for racing Thoroughbreds”...

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